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SNR Noticeboard

  • Crossing the Line: Ritual and Superstition at Sea
  • Anderson Medal Reception
  • Postponement Maritime History North’s spring 2014 seminar
  • Docklands History Group Conference
  • British Dockyards in the First World War
  • RIN will host EGR Taylor lecture on 9 Oct 2014

The Society for Nautical Research

The Society for Nautical Research was founded in 1910 to encourage research into matters relating to seafaring and shipbuilding in all ages among all nations, into the language and customs of the sea, and into other matters of nautical interest. The Mariner’s Mirror is the journal of the Society, and has been published since 1911.  It takes its name from Lucas Janszoon Waghenaer’s nautical chart book Spieghel der Zeevaerde or ‘Mariner’s Mirror’, first published in 1584.  The cover illustration seen here is taken from the English translation of 1588.

 

The Mariner’s Mirror is recognised as the international journal of record for maritime and naval history.  It is ranked by the European reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH) as an INT1 journal (the highest classification) which has internationally recognised scholarly significance with high visibility and influence among researchers in the various research domains in different countries and is regularly cited all over the world.

 

The Society has played a major role in promoting international scholarship in naval and maritime history and in preserving and promoting the maritime heritage of the UK.  It ensured the survival of Nelson’s flagship by raising the Save the Victory Fund in 1922 and has been closely associated with her restoration ever since.  It assisted the frigate Foudroyant (1817) in her role of youth training ship, helping to ensure her survival as Trincomalee, and supported the return of SS Great Britain (1843) from the Falkland Islands to Bristol.  The Society was instrumental in founding the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich in 1937 and the Royal Naval Museum at Portsmouth in 1972.  It continues to have close links with both institutions.

 

Members receive four issues of The Mariner’s Mirror each year plus a range of other benefits.  For further details about membership click the Membership tab above.

 

The Editorial Board of The Mariner’s Mirror is made up of internationally renowned historians, each of whom brings a wealth of scholarship to the task of identifying the best amongst current research.  Its members include:

 

 

M. Bellamy, BSc PhD (Editor)

Joost C.A. Schokkenbrock, PhD

D. Ford, BA MA PhD (Reviews Editor)

Lt Cdr W.J.R. Gardner, MPhil FRHist RN

Professor E.J. Grove, MA PhD

Professor J.B. Hattendorf, MA DPhil

Poul Holm, MA PhD

A. James, BA MA PhD

Professor A. Lambert, MA PhD

Professor D. Massarella, MA DPhil FRHist

P.T. van der Merwe, MBE MA Dip Drama, PhD

Professor H. Murphy, MA PhD

Professor D.J. Oddy, BSc (Econ) PhD

Professor S.R. Palmer, BA MA PhD FRHist

S. Rose, MA PhD

Lt Cdr F.J.M. Scott, MA FNI RN

Professor S. Tenold, MSc MPhil PhD(Econ)

Professor G. Till, MA PhD


The Society:

  1. Supports and encourages research into maritime history and nautical archaeology
  2. Publishes the pre-eminent academic nautical journal, The Mariner's Mirror, each quarter (available to all SNR members as part of their membership fee)
  3. Sponsors conferences, lectures, seminars and other events concerning maritime history
  4. Buys paintings and other works of art for the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich
  5. Funds the preservation of Nelson's flagship, HMS Victory, and other heritage projects

The Society grew out of the kindred nautical interests of forty founders in 1910 and celebrated its centenary year in 2010. Two Society members commemorated that moment with a complete history of the Society for Nautical Research The Mirror of the Seas.

 

The tug at the entrance to the Deutsches Schiffahrts Museum, Bremerhaven